8 min read

5 Top Email Hacks for Prospecting

By Mary Grothe on Mar 20, 2020 9:49:27 AM

  1. Use the prospect’s first name in the subject line, use a meaningful sentence as the subject, and avoid capitalizing the first letter of each word.

  2. Take advantage of the first two lines of the email, which will be the “preview” your prospect reads in their inbox.

  3. Quit talking about yourself - find a point of commonality between you two that generates interest for them to learn more about the problems you solve for them.

  4. Close the email with a simple question about opening some dialogue on what you’ve done for others.

  5. Realize most prospects will read your email on their mobile, proof it on yours before you send it to them.

Email prospecting can be frustrating. Most reps “hide” behind email prospecting because their call reluctance creates a strong fear of cold calling. Email is easier, right? You have time to write out your thoughts, you can edit them before sending, and you can even automate email prospecting! Unfortunately, a million other sales people and marketers agree with you, which is causing an obscene amount of spam in prospect inboxes.

I’m an executive. I run a company. I am prospected all the time. Over 90% of the emails I receive from salespeople get deleted before I am done reading the subject line. I can sniff out a sales rep within the first few words. However, every now and then, a very well crafted email makes its way to me and I engage the sales person.

What do they do that causes me to engage? They get on MY sidewalk. They speak to me, in my language, and talk about something that is relevant to me. They’re casual and brief in their email. They get me excited to learn more.

I’ve studied hundreds of prospecting emails over the last year and here is what I have found to catch my attention.

 

Hack #1

Use the prospect’s first name in the subject line, use a meaningful sentence as the subject, and avoid capitalizing the first letter of each word.

When an email subject line has my name in it, I immediately look at the sender’s name. If I do not recognize their name, I read the rest of the subject line. Seeing my name catches my eye, it immediately draws me in. But the rep can blow it if they indicate they’re selling something in the subject line… I can tell when I am being sold to or marketed to when the first letter of each word is capitalized. I can also tell when a question is being asked that clearly indicates they’re trying to see if I have a certain “problem” or interest in their industry, product or service.

Here’s what works.

Start your email in the subject line…. Yes - it is engaging and it helps open rates!

Example email subject line: Mary, I drove by your location earlier today…

This immediately triggers me and causes me to read the email. I ask myself, who is this person? Why did they drive by? Is this a potential customer? How do they know about us? What did they need?

Hack #2

Take advantage of the first two lines of the email, which will be the “preview” your prospect reads in their inbox.

Please immediately stop introducing yourself in the first two lines of your email. It’s redundant and a waste of space. They can see your name as the sender of the email AND they can see your email signature. Stating your name a 3rd time makes no sense… yet I see this all the time. Hi Mary, my name is Alex. I am the lead recruiter over here at ABC recruiting. Yada yada yada…. Try using something more engaging!

My recommendation? Continue the sentence from the subject line - you already said my name in the subject and started a sentence.. Continue it.

Example email subject line: Mary, I drove by your location earlier today…

Example first two lines email: … I had to come by and see it myself. After you posted that photo on LinkedIn, I knew I needed to come by.

What’s happened here? I am completely sucked into this. Which photo? What did they see? This is about ME. Prospects really enjoy when you make it about THEM…. NOT YOU.

Hack #3

Quit talking about yourself - find a point of commonality between you two that generates interest for them to learn more about the problems you solve for them.

You’re a stranger, you’re interrupting them. You only get on their sidewalk when you speak their language and discuss a point of commonality, something of relevance to them.

Before you ever email a prospect, please look them up on LinkedIn, Google, their website, or another form of social media. Find ONE talking point that will both resonate with them and lead you two into a discussion of the problems you solve for them.

Please avoid pitching your products and services “we have leading technology” or “our product is award-winning” and avoid using vague marketing terms like “we give companies peace of mind” or “we save them time and money” or “we have the best customer service”. This is boring and it shifts the focus to you… but they don’t know you yet and you haven’t earned the right to pitch or talk about you.

Use that one point of commonality and start creating a discussion about the problems you can solve for this prospect.

Example body of email, continued: You’re clearly making waves in the sales training industry. That empty warehouse will soon become your brand image and set the tone for the work you do. Most business owners panic when they move into an office space for the first time. They aren’t sure how to furnish it with dynamic style that communicates their brand without breaking the bank or having to personally build IKEA furniture for the next month.

This email has everything to do about me, my fears, my needs, and my problems. The rep hasn’t pitched or sold to me yet. I am smart, so I realize they must work in the office furniture industry… it doesn’t negatively trigger me. They’re speaking my language… those are all concerns of mine. Now I am asking myself, how can they help me?

Hack #4

Close the email with a simple question about opening some dialogue about what you’ve done for others.

This is simple and straightforward. End your email with a question about providing social proof or a third party story of what you’ve done for others. Prospects love hearing about how your product or service solves problems and provides ROI. So offer it up to them before closing to schedule a full-blown discovery meeting.

Example email close: Are you open to some dialogue on how we have helped others with spaces like yours?

This close feels safe. They aren’t trying to sell me. They aren’t asking me for an hour of my time. They are allowing me to hear a story and make a decision if I feel like meeting with them. This feels good.

Hack #5

Realize most prospects read your email on their mobile, proof it on yours before you send it to them.

Whereas I do not know the exact stats, I would guess more than 50% of emails are read on a mobile device. With that, be sure you send it to yourself and proof it on your mobile… this extra little step will help you catch emails that are too long, can be trimmed up, or need some restructuring.

Let’s put this example email together…

SUBJECT: Mary, I drove by your location earlier today…

BODY: … I had to come by and see it myself. After you posted that photo on LinkedIn, I knew I needed to come by. You’re clearly making waves in the sales training industry. That empty warehouse will soon become your brand image and set the tone for the work you do. Most business owners panic when they move into an office space for the first time. They aren’t sure how to furnish it with dynamic style that communicates their brand without breaking the bank or having to personally build IKEA furniture for the next month.

Are you open to some dialogue on how we have helped others with spaces like yours?

Download our easy-to-follow email template here.

 

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Mary Grothe, CEO Sales BQ®

Mary Grothe

Written by Mary Grothe